Did you know that a quality storage shed can not only add to the aesthetic value of your home but it can add to the market value as well? Few backyard accessories are actually able to add anything to a home’s value in today’s market. But the right storage shed can. The tricky part is that not all sheds are created equal. Some are far more likely to make your yard look nicer, increase your storage space and add value to your home than others.

Sheds are expensive, but there are many options to get one

Backyard storage sheds are like anything else. You tend to get what you pay for. As with anything else concerning your home, it’s almost always a good idea not to go cheap, even if the most expensive options are way over your budget. Erring on the side of quality is always a good bet.

Unfortunately, this means that most of the storage buildings costing less than $500 will be off the table. But there are many rent to own storage buildings. This can be an attractive option, especially for those who suddenly find themselves needing additional storage space. For someone who has suddenly run out of storage space due to purchasing a new car, moving, inheriting a large number of items or any other reason getting a new storage shed may be the only practical way out of the shortage of space. In this case, renting to own a storage shed can allow them to get the right shed for their yard on short notice.

It’s rarely better to go for the cheaper options

While high-quality storage sheds can be a considerable upgrade for your yard and even add real value to your home, cheap storage sheds can very often do the opposite. It is very tempting for those on a limited budget to go with inexpensive options. Modern aluminum and canopy storage structures can be bought for as little as $100, while quality, concrete-foundation, frame-built storage sheds can cost upwards of $5,000, at the low end. But going for those cheaper models is usually not the best option.

Cheaper sheds have a number of problems. While aluminum sheds with steel frames are often able to endure standard weather conditions, if you live in an area that is prone to extreme weather, such as the lower Midwest or the Great Plains, these structures will likely be destroyed within 10 years of installation. Canopy structures are typically much worse. At an average Midwestern home, a canopy storage structure will be lucky to make it through a single summer without incurring major damage.

On the other hand, cement-foundation barn-type structures are famously solid. In many cases, they’re the only structures left standing after tornadoes have come through an area.

The other problem with cheaper structures is that they will actually detract from a home’s value. Unless you live on a bona fide farm, you will probably be advised by a realtor to tear down any aluminum structures on your property before listing your home for sale.

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